BackUbiquity Radio Music and DJ Schedule
Tue, October 24 2017
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  • TUE
    24
    Clear skies
    28°/20°
  • TUE
    24
    Jazz Funk

    Tuesday Oct 24
    24:00 - 01:00 GMT

    jazzfunkdance.jpgJazz Funk, unlike northern soul and acid jazz, is a recognised music genre. Many early jazz-funk artists were organists, like Lonnie Smith, Reuben Wilson, Charles Earland, and Jack McDuff, other key figures in this genre included saxophonist Eddie Harris and vibraphonist Roy Ayers. Artists like trumpeter Donald Byrd, flautist Bobbi Humphrey, and keyboardist Ronnie Foster. Keyboard maestros such as Herbie Hancock and Lonnie Liston Smith explored a spacier, more atmospheric brand of jazz-funk, while the artists on Creed Taylor's CTI label (most prominently Freddie Hubbard) were wrapped in a shinier, more polished production. Unlike jazz fusion, jazz-funk was always marked by its devotion to R&B, and maintained the upbeat, celebratory vibe of funk. Jazz-funk became highly popular in the British underground music scene in the mid to late 1970s, DJs like Colin Curtis,Graham Warr, Ian Dewhirst and Paul Schofield championed the genre, along with George Power, Chris Hill and Bob Jones in the South. Radio DJ, Robbie Vincent championed the genre across the London airwaves, developing a hard-core following of devoted jazz funkateers.

  • TUE
    24
    Rare Funk

    Tuesday Oct 24
    01:00 - 02:00 GMT

    rarefunk.png Rare Funk. We continually add to our selection of earthy 60’s and 70’s funk that failed to gain recognition on the same scale as many household names in the funk music genre. In the words of DJ, Musician and archivist, Markey Funk, “the most interesting stuff came out on obscure labels, was distributed locally, never gained any success, and 90% of these artists never managed to record enough material for a full-length LP.”

  • TUE
    24
    Rare Groove

    Tuesday Oct 24
    02:00 - 03:00 GMT

    raregroove.jpgRare Groove was a the term coined by British DJ Norman Jay after his The Original Rare Groove Show on pirate radio station Kiss 94 FM that featured a mainly urban soundtrack from the 1970s and 1980s mixed with early house music.The mid-80’s rare groove scene began when DJs presented an eclectic mix of music that placed a particular emphasis on politically articulate dance-funk recordings connected to the Black Power movement. Pirate radio stations and DJs participated in a 'recovery, repackaging and retrieval' of obscure music that reflected, related to or translated inequalities of race and gender and the struggles of the civil rights movement. Music that had failed to gain acceptance in a previous time was given a 'new lease of life' by DJs on pirate radio stations.

  • TUE
    24
    Acid Jazz

    Tuesday Oct 24
    03:00 - 04:00 GMT

    download.png Acid Jazz was probably a definition coined by DJ and Jazz connoisseur Gilles Peterson. It is a useful umbrella term to describe a particular sound and style of Jazz played by a diverse selection of bands. Is it a musical genre? No. Does it relate to any clubbing movement in London or elsewhere? No. Is it a useful marketing ploy by the music industry to repackage existing Jazz tracks for a younger audience? Probably.

  • TUE
    24
    I Love Music

    Tuesday Oct 24
    04:00 - 05:00 GMT

    i love music.jpg I Love Music commemorates an era in the mid-1970’s when, faced with the reality of a diminishing supply of obscure records from the sixties, a small number of DJs in the north of England decided to break ranks and spin the more contemporary sounds of black America. These sounds ushered in by bands such as Crown Heights Affair, Rimshots, Raw Soul, East Coast Connection, The Voices of East Harlem, The Skullsnaps, Lonnie Liston Smith, Gil Scott-Heron and others were not welcomed by all ‘die-hard’ sixties soul fans however significant numbers embraced this new development and soon these ‘newies’ with their syncopated funky beats heralded the introduction of frenetic styles of dancing not hitherto seen on ‘northern’ dance floors.

  • TUE
    24
    Blaxploitation

    Tuesday Oct 24
    05:00 - 07:00 GMT

    blaxployposter.jpgWe can't profess to being a funk and soul radio station without paying homage to the era of blaxploitation, the cult film genre that swept into Black American communities beginning in the early 70s, in the wake of Melvin Van Peebles' groundbreaking independent film Sweetback's Baadasssss Song. Sweetback ushered in an era of film making that wasn't nearly as serious as Van Peebles' movie. Quite quickly, his innovations were diluted and channeled into a genre called blaxploitation. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) head and ex-film publicist Junius Griffin coined the term from the words 'black' and 'exploitation. However, the soundtrack for these films sometimes surpassed the popularity of the films themselves, and are still revered today as the ultimate music to define a very unique period of funk and soul where cinematic orchestration, a plethora of wah-wahs, deep resonating bass, and funky beats were most prevalent.

  • TUE
    24
    In The Shadows of Motown

    Tuesday Oct 24
    07:00 - 09:00 GMT

    vinylrecordsrare.jpgIn The Shadows of Motown pays homage to not only the greats of Motown but to the many hundreds of bands that stood in the shadows of the Detroit giant. Often influenced and inspired by the Gordy sound these bands were under promoted and often overlooked by the radio stations of the time. In fact many of the records we feature were only resurrected and given exposure by a small number of soul clubs, predominantly in the north of England, during the late sixties and early seventies. These clubs and their patrons preferred the gritty soulful vocal and ‘four on the floor’ arrangements to the increasingly polished and formulaic Motown productions. The fact that many of these bands had not gained any prominence in the United States was an added bonus and became almost a prerequisite for these ‘northern’ soul fans, as the obscurity and rarity added to a record's desirability and of course collectability. The northern 'rare soul' scene was born.

  • TUE
    24
    Rare Funk

    Tuesday Oct 24
    13:00 - 14:00 GMT

    rarefunkgrooves.jpgRare Funk. We continually add to our selection of earthy 60’s and 70’s funk that failed to gain recognition on the same scale as many household names in the funk music genre. In the words of DJ, Musician and archivist, Markey Funk, “the most interesting stuff came out on obscure labels, was distributed locally, never gained any success, and 90% of these artists never managed to record enough material for a full-length LP.”

  • TUE
    24
    Rare Groove

    Tuesday Oct 24
    14:00 - 15:00 GMT

    raregroove.jpgRare Groove was a the term coined by British DJ Norman Jay after his 'The Original Rare Groove show' on pirate radio station Kiss 94 FM. It featured a mainly urban soundtrack from the 1970s and 1980s mixed with early house music.The mid-80's rare groove scene developed when DJs presented an eclectic mix of music that placed a particular emphasis on politically articulate dance-funk recordings connected to the Black Power movement. Pirate radio stations and DJs participated in a 'recovery, repackaging and retrieval' of obscure music that reflected, related to or translated inequalities of race and gender and the struggles of the civil rights movement. Music that had failed to gain acceptance in a previous time was given a 'new lease of life' by DJs on pirate radio stations.

  • TUE
    24
    Acid Jazz

    Tuesday Oct 24
    15:00 - 17:00 GMT

    download.png Acid Jazz was probably a definition coined by DJ and Jazz connoisseur Gilles Peterson. It is a useful umbrella term to describe a particular sound and style of Jazz played by a diverse selection of bands. Is it a musical genre? No. Does it relate to any clubbing/youth movement in London or elsewhere? No. Is it a clever marketing ploy by the music industry to encourage us to revisit jazz/funk/hip-hop gems? Probably.

  • TUE
    24
    I Love Music

    Tuesday Oct 24
    17:00 - 19:00 GMT

    i love music.jpg  I Love Music remembers an era in the mid-1970's when faced with the reality of a diminishing supply of obscure records from the 1960's, a small number of DJs in the north of England decided to break ranks and spin the more contemporary sounds of black America. These sounds ushered in by bands such as Crown Heights Affair, Skull Snaps, East Coast Connection and Voices of East Harlem were not welcomed by many of the die-hard sixties soul purists, however significant numbers embraced this new development and soon these 'newies' with their syncopated funky beats heralded a new dawn of frenetic and freestyle dancing not hitherto seen in the north of England.

  • TUE
    24
    Jazz Funk

    Tuesday Oct 24
    19:00 - 20:00 GMT

    jazzfunkdance.jpg Jazz Funk, unlike northern soul and acid jazz, is a recognised music genre. Many early jazz-funk artists were organists, like Lonnie Smith, Reuben Wilson, Charles Earland, and Jack McDuff, other key figures included saxophonist Eddie Harris and vibraphonist Roy Ayers. Artists like trumpeter Donald Byrd, flautist Bobbi Humphrey, and keyboardist Ronnie Foster. Keyboard maestros such as Herbie Hancock and Lonnie Liston Smith explored a spacier, more atmospheric brand of jazz-funk, while the artists on Creed Taylor's CTI label (most prominently Freddie Hubbard) were wrapped in a shinier, more polished production. Unlike jazz fusion, jazz-funk was always marked by its devotion to R&B, and maintained the upbeat, celebratory vibe of funk. Jazz-funk became highly popular in the British underground music scene in the mid to late 1970s, DJs like Colin Curtis,Graham Warr, Ian Dewhirst and Paul Schofield championed the genre, along with George Power, Chris Hill and Bob Jones in the South. Radio DJ, Robbie Vincent championed the genre across the London airwaves, developing a hard-core following of devoted jazz funkateers.

  • TUE
    24

    In The Shadows of Motown

    Tuesday Oct 24
    20:00 - 22:00 GMT

    vinylrecordsrare.jpgIn The Shadows of Motown pays homage to not only the greats of Motown but to the many hundreds of bands that stood in the shadows of the Detroit giant. Often influenced and inspired by the Gordy sound these bands were under promoted and often overlooked by the radio stations of the time. In fact many of the records we feature were only resurrected and given exposure by a small number of soul clubs, predominantly in the north of England, during the late sixties and early seventies. These clubs and their patrons preferred the gritty soulful vocal and ‘four on the floor’ arrangements to the increasingly polished and formulaic Motown productions. The fact that many of these bands had not gained any prominence in the United States was an added bonus and became almost a prerequisite for these ‘northern’ soul fans, as the obscurity and rarity added to a record's desirability and of course collectability. The northern 'rare soul' scene was born.

  • TUE
    24
    Japanese Jazz Fusion

    Tuesday Oct 24
    20:00 - 21:00 GMT

    japjazz.jpgModern jazz gained momentum in Japan at the turn of the ’60s, with many Japanese jazz musicians moving to America, the homeland of the music, to hone their skills further. Saxophone player Sadao Watanabe and pianist Toshiko Akiyoshi were the early forerunners, with bassist Teruo Nakamura following quickly behind. Fusion was strongly tied in with the technological development of instruments during the ’70’s, particularly synthesisers and electric pianos. Many very talented guitarists emerged from the Japanese fusion scene, Ryo Kawasaki and Yoshiaki Masuo chief among them. Ryo Kawasaki is also known for the project Tarika Blue, which he formed together with James Mason from Roy Ayers’ Ubiquity label.

  • TUE
    24

    Hugh Williams and The Souled Out show

    Tuesday Oct 24
    21:00 - 23:00 GMT

    hughwilliams.jpgHugh Williams & The Souled Out Show

    Hugh has been a DJ since the age of 15 and has played in clubs all over the UK and Europe from London to Vienna, from Oslo to Zurich. In the late 80’s he was approached by Radio Maspalomas in Gran Canaria to present a daily English language show which continued for 3 years until his return to the UK.Since returning to the UK, Hugh has worked at clubs such as Equinox (Leicester square), Eros (Enfield), The Blue Orchid (Croydon), Liquid (Luton) and Tokyo Joe’s (West End).During this period he also ran a studio in Croydon and enjoyed some success with this, having a top 40 single and doing remix work for acts such as N Trance. For the last few years Hugh been back to basics playing at one off Soul events and is now a teacher in adult education and also a life mentor in addition to presenting The Souled Out Show on radio stations around the world. Hugh grew up musically in an era when soul music was a massive influence and fell in love with it in his teens. He has a massive collection of soul music from Motown and Northern Soul right through to the so called 80’s groove and on in to the 90’s and beyond. His Souled Out Show plays the very best of current soul and funk together with the occasional classic. Hugh is keen to champion current Soul artists that are looking to get exposure on radio.

  • TUE
    24
    Salsoul

    Tuesday Oct 24
    21:00 - 22:00 GMT

    salsoul.jpgThe name Salsoul was most probably coined by Joe Bataan who says he used the term to suggest the marriage of salsa and soul. It was also Joe Bataan who helped guide Salsoul into the disco era. But it has to be Salsoul Records , originating in 1974, the New York City based label as one of the most influential record companies in the disco era that has shaped the dance music industry for decades. Artists such as Instant Funk, Loleatta Holloway, Carol Williams, Jocelyn Brown, Double Exposure, First Choice, Joe Bataan, the Salsoul Orchestra (led by Vincent Montana Jr.), Inner Life, Skyy, and Charo were at one time part of their roster. If you're not familiar with Salsoul Records, chances are you've heard the labels songs or instrumentation sampled in hundreds of today's dance tracks. Salsoul is known not only for its legendary catalog but also for being the first record label to release a commercially available 12' single record.

  • TUE
    24
    Blaxploitation

    Tuesday Oct 24
    22:00 - 24:00 GMT

    blaxployposter.jpgWe can't profess to being a funk and soul radio station without paying homage to the era of blaxploitation, the cult film genre that swept into Black American communities beginning in the early 70s, in the wake of Melvin Van Peebles' groundbreaking independent film Sweetback's Baadasssss Song. Sweetback ushered in an era of film making that wasn't nearly as serious as Van Peebles' movie. Quite quickly, his innovations were diluted and channeled into a genre called blaxploitation. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) head and ex-film publicist Junius Griffin coined the term from the words 'black' and 'exploitation. However, the soundtrack for these films sometimes surpassed the popularity of the films themselves, and are still revered today as the ultimate music to define a very unique period of funk and soul where cinematic orchestration, a plethora of wah-wahs, deep resonating bass, and funky beats were most prevalent.

We Play Soul-Jazz-Funk 24-7-365
 
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